Artist: The school of Jan Brueghel the younger (1601-1678), Flemish.
Year: Late 17th Century.
Medium: Oil on Wood.
Size: Height - 32", Width - 39"

1993.03.03 EL On loan from the Noel family

Adelicia owned this painting and it hung in the Grand Salon.  We are not able to hang the painting in that room today because of conservation reasons. During the middle of the nineteenth century, there was interest among more sophisticated art collectors for the 17th century Flemish and Dutch paintings.  Those who went on the grand tour would sometimes be able to acquire some of these antique paintings to add to their collections.  Brueghel was one of the leading painters of his day and his reputation has remained outstanding throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.  The subject matter is from classical mythology.

 

The subject matter of this painting is an allegory on water.  This painting, along with Riches of the Sea, could have been part of a series on the four elements: water, air, earth and fire.  Vulcan and his forge was often used to represent fire.

Elopement Packages at Belmont Mansion

Intimate and elegant wedding ceremonies are popular at Belmont Mansion! 

 

Visit BelmontMansionEvents.com to review options to Elope in Nashville at Belmont Mansion. 

Affordable Nashville Elopements start here!

GPS ADDRESS

Belmont Blvd & Acklen Avenue 

Nashville, TN 37212

MAILING ADDRESS

1900 Belmont Blvd

Nashville, TN 37212

615-460-5459

  • Facebook Clean
  • Twitter Clean
  • Instagram Clean
  • White Pinterest Icon

The architecture of Belmont Mansion makes it one of the most significant homes of 19th century Tennessee.

Sold by the Acklen family in 1887, the house went to a developer who began one of Nashville’s early suburbs.

It was then purchased by two women who in 1890 started a college which evolved into Belmont University. Today the Belmont Mansion Association, which was formed in 1972, owns the collection, runs the museum, and shares this unique story of 19th century Nashville with visitors from far and near.

Photos by Ed Houk