Pauline, Claude and William Acklen in Paris

Left to right

Photographer: Menut Alexander Alophe (1812-1883)

Studio: Ane. Mon. G Le Gray & Cie.

Backmark: Ane. Mon. G Le Gray & Cie.

Alophe Succr.

Paris

35 Boulev. Des Capucines

Place: Paris, France

Date: 1865-1866

Provenance: Adelicia to her daughter Pauline Acklen Locket, unknown, purchased by Belmont Mansion Association from a photograph dealer in Pennsylvania.

2016.01.50 BMA purchase

This photo places the children in a domestic setting with very upscale furniture.  Interestingly, only three children are shown in this photo.  The odd number of subjects provides a more artistic shoot than an even number.

 

Menut Alexander Alophe started taking photography lessons from the famous Nadar (pseudonym for Gaspard-Felix Tournachon, 1820-1910) in 1856 and rented an apartment from Nadar at 35 Boulevard des Capucines.  When Gustave Le Gray went bankrupt in 1860, Alophe occupied his studio.  Nadar also moved into that building the same year.  In 1874, Alophe moved to 25 rue Royale.

 

Mark Brown

Elopement Packages at Belmont Mansion

Intimate and elegant wedding ceremonies are popular at Belmont Mansion! 

 

Visit BelmontMansionEvents.com to review options to Elope in Nashville at Belmont Mansion. 

Affordable Nashville Elopements start here!

GPS ADDRESS

Belmont Blvd & Acklen Avenue 

Nashville, TN 37212

MAILING ADDRESS

1900 Belmont Blvd

Nashville, TN 37212

615-460-5459

  • Facebook Clean
  • Twitter Clean
  • Instagram Clean
  • White Pinterest Icon

The architecture of Belmont Mansion makes it one of the most significant homes of 19th century Tennessee.

Sold by the Acklen family in 1887, the house went to a developer who began one of Nashville’s early suburbs.

It was then purchased by two women who in 1890 started a college which evolved into Belmont University. Today the Belmont Mansion Association, which was formed in 1972, owns the collection, runs the museum, and shares this unique story of 19th century Nashville with visitors from far and near.

Photos by Ed Houk