https://www.web-stat.com/stats/checkstats.pl?loginID=WunlyX8AAAEAAGh7d2oAAAAG Visit to Belmont

Visit to Belmont

July 3, 2017

During the days of Adelicia, Belmont Mansion was one of the premiere party destinations in Nashville. The stunning grounds and opulent house made it the ideal setting for a Victorian affair. In September 1877, Dr. Cheatham and Adelicia hosted a reception for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. This brief description of the event, allows us to step back in time and imagine the beauty and splendor of a 19th century Belmont Mansion party. 

 

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"Thursday evening the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at the kind invitation of Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Cheatham, repaired to their residence in a body. As the carriages drove up through the magnificent grounds of Belmont, a band of music, concealed in a cluster of evergreens, welcomed them with a fine burst of melody. The association was largely accompanied with ladies, and they were received in the hall by Dr. Cheatham and son, and Colonel Acklen, of Louisiana, and conducted into the drawing room, where they were greeted by Mrs. Dr. Cheatham, assisted by the beautiful and accomplished Mrs. Goodman, nee Acklen, of Memphis. The evening was spent in the most charming manner-ices and fruits everywhere to cool the inner man-sparkling wit incited by the presence of many lovely women, flowers and pictures all around-the scene was one to delight the beholder and ravish his senses. Soon the grounds were permeated all around with promenaders, and to add to the completeness of the occasion, Mrs. Craig, the pet of Nashville, regaled the throng with three of her charming songs. They were of course met with the heartiest applause, and the whispered query all around was, "Who is she?" You may believe the Nashvillians were not slow to claim the sweet songstress. Nashville and Tennessee may well be proud of these hospitable citizens who have contributed so notably in enhancing the pleasure of our visitors and giving eclat to their visit."

 

RURAL SUN, September 6, 1877, p. 760.